Belgian GP: One rule for one…

Don’t know if you saw the GP2 race here this afternoon. It made dramatic viewing, which can be a nuisance when you’re trying to write a story on deadline for a Sunday newspaper on the F1 qualifying that preceded the GP2  and these guys are racing like there is no tomorrow.

The open expanses of Spa produced some great moves but the most controversial one came at about 0.005mph in the pits. Bruno Senna, who had led from pole, made his mandatory stop for new tyres, the iSport team releasing him just as another driver, running further down the field, was coming by and heading for his pit. The cars almost touched but no one was impeded, the only potential hazard being for the crew in the adjoining pit
to iSport, who were forced to smartly step back.

The incident was very similar to the one in Valencia two weeks ago when Felipe Massa was released just as Adrian Sutil was coming by, in the fast lane, on his way to the exit.

The difference is that Massa was allowed by officials to continue on his way to victory whereas Senna was forced to take a drive-through. It cost Senna the lead and brought no points as he recovered from 24th to an eventual 12th place. It could also have cost the Brazilian the GP2 championship with three races (starting with the sprint tomorrow) to go.

There are various arguments currently doing the rounds of the media centre. Senna’s penalty was consistent with punishments delivered for similar offences during the Valencia GP2 race. On the other hand, FIA officials were in charge on each occasion and the Massa verdict raises questions of how a dodgy release can be worth a fine for the team in F1 but so unsafe in GP2 that the driver, merely doing as instructed, pays a high price.

You can argue that the junior drivers and their teams need to be kept in line whereas their experienced brothers are supposed to know what they’re doing. The unfortunate part for the FIA is that the Valencia incident involved Ferrari. Had Massa been penalised, it would have seriously compromised his championship. You can probably here the paddock muttering from wherever you are.

What do you think?

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It’s been said a billion times, so it’ll be said once more – the FIA need to keep the Ferraris happy else they’ll be sleeping on the sofa that night.

And I wouldn’t be surprised if Hamilton gets his victory taken away from him for his fight with Raikonnen. Yet if it were the other way round, the FIA would turn a blind eye.

Not that it matters – Raikonnen’s driving put him into a wall in the end anyway.

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I totally agree with you Maurice on this one! Its the same with the belgian F1 race thats just happened: if it had been a Ferrari who hit Webber on the chicane, nothing would have happened, whereas because it was a McMerc, Kovi was given a drive through! It’s all well and good Ross Brawn saying yesterday that the FIA do not look favourably upon Ferrari, but this is simply not true and the racing community need to stand up and say this!!

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The FIA will do anything they possibley can to let ferrari win the championship… including altering finishing positions to promote their favourite driver ie. Massa.

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Favourite driver heh? Massa was punished in a stupid way on the canadian GP last year. Hamilton overtook Kimi and let him pass, just, to only overtake again on the same track sector =\ that’s dirty.

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Too True!!!

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So Ferrari get McClaren penalised yet again!!! If a ferrari had so-called “cut” a corner nothing would have been said. Whenever there is an incident involving a ferrari and any other car, the ferrari driver always gets off scott free. I wonder why that is? Maybe it is about time the other teams got together and protested about this bias towards the Ferrari team. Something needs to be done.

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why not just hand ferrari the championship and the real event is for second.has ferrari ever lost a decision?… ps is seb vettel jeremy clarkson`s long lost son?

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the only consistency when it comes to the FIA is precisely the lack of it.

sad really.

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i dont know about you Maurice but im getting really tired with the FIA not just because of blatant favouritism to the red cars on the circuit. But also the general lack of consistincy from the supposed governing body of this sport. Something needs to be done i’d start with the man at the top……for the sake of formula 1

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I am not a McClaren or Ferrari fan, I am a Motor racing fan. The first Grand Prix I attended was at Silverstone the year Mike Hawthorne won the Championship. That makes me a long time enthusiast.However, not only has technology ruined any semblance of actual racing but politics and money have put the nail in the coffin for me. The time has come for the so called ruling body to rule showing no bias to any driver, car, or team. This is clearly not happening, the FIA is beyond a joke. Open comment to Bernie Ecclestone, do something to prevent F1 falling any more into disrepute before the public lose interest completely.

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The last time i can remember a Ferrari receiving a penalty was when they were both disqualified for failing a wing mesurement back when i was about ten year old.

If i were list all the penalties awarded to McLaren (yes i know how to spell McLaren unlike many others in this blog) since that incident i would probably use up my word limit before i was even half way. Althought the penalty awarded to Heikki was probably fair enough (although it is debatable as to wether or not it would have been awarded to a Ferrari) the latest 25 second penalty awarded to Lewis Hamilton is well and truly beyond a joke. Considering Hamilton slowed down to allow Raikkonen to retake the positon as is proved by McLarens telemetry.

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all the crazy decisions in motorsport, and of cos, the mad max saga and the eventual vote of confidence or whatever it was, in short, the FIA is bringing EVERYTHING into disrepute and they should be punished more heavily than the 100m fine to McLaren and the stripping of their points.

oh wait they won’t punish themselves would them…

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Looking back at the last few seasons of F1 there certainly seems to have been a degree of bias towards Ferrari and against McLaren on the part of the FIA. Surely there are enough big-company sponsors involved in F1 who can bring pressure to bear to make the FIA see sense. The sport is in grave danger of loosing public support and the enthusiasm of the fans if it carries on like this.

I’d hesitate to say that there appears to be a back-room campaign against McLaren and Hamilton winning a championship but the FIA certainly seems by its actions and decisions to be confirming that it is a case of finding any excuse to stop the most talented driver from winning. I think it stinks.

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View the lap after Hamilton took the lead and you’ll see he weaved twice on the straight after eau rouge once on the exit and once on the entry to the next corner, thats a drive through penalty.

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yeah but he wasn’t blocking, he might have been just trying to build heat into the tyres.

and the drive through given wasn’t for that reason anyway.

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the rules state that you can only weave once on any one straight to block a pass, the ferrari is faster in a straight line so in fact hamilton should have had 50 seconds added not 25 !!

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